High School Art

I made the road trip up to Iowa for a family visit and as part of an extended trip where I will be working on a few personal projects for the next month. Here are a few images from the last week. The first is from the drive up from Houston. I found this old pump at a gas station in Texas where I made a pit stop.

The next few are portraits I shot of my high school art teacher, Darvin. He taught my first photography class. I am fairly sure that everyone who has gone through his classes has made some sort of portrait of the poor man. He hates having his picture taken but is always amenable to his students. He was kind enough to humor me when I went back to pack up my show ‘Quiet Beauty’ that hung at the Iowa Mennonite School art gallery this past spring. Darvin was one of the best teachers I’ve ever had. He taught me what may be the most valuable and possibly hardest lesson I’ve ever learned – how to take criticism well. Thank you Darvin.

Flashes of Hope

I recently finished a project for Flashes of Hope, a national non-profit organization that provides “uplifting portraits of children fighting cancer and other life threatening illnesses” to the families of the patients. I became involved with Flashes of Hope through my local ASMP. The shoot itself went very smoothly. We photographed 12 families in one morning, including one from Scotland and one from Nepal.

Flashes of Hope also provides a makeup artist for the patients and families which is really nice for kids going through chemo and parents who haven’t had a full night’s sleep in days. Well, ok, so the guys could have done without it but women always love a free session from a professional makeup artist.

The Flashes of Hope representative and hospital staff said afterward that everyone there had a great time. Even the teenagers I photographed enjoyed the experience! Wow, I wouldn’t have guessed that one. I had a blast. My sense of humor couldn’t resist bringing a pair of high-brow disguise glasses. I went into the shoot hoping I could get at least one kid to wear them, but it turned out that almost everyone wanted to pose in the goofy glasses. I really enjoyed working with the kids and families, I hope they enjoy the prints from Flashes of Hope.

Flashes of Hope

Flashes of Hope

Flashes of Hope

Flashes of Hope